Last edited by Brat
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

6 edition of Industry and economic decline in seventeenth-century Venice found in the catalog.

Industry and economic decline in seventeenth-century Venice

Richard T. Rapp

Industry and economic decline in seventeenth-century Venice

by Richard T. Rapp

  • 59 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading

Published by Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Venice (Italy),
  • Italy,
  • Venice
    • Subjects:
    • City and town life -- Italy -- Venice -- History -- 17th century,
    • Venice (Italy) -- Economic conditions

    • Edition Notes

      StatementRichard Tilden Rapp.
      SeriesHarvard historical monographs ;, 69
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHC308.V4 R36
      The Physical Object
      Paginationix, 195 p. :
      Number of Pages195
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5194560M
      ISBN 100674445457
      LC Control Number75016149

      This book is published by Liberty Fund, Inc., a foundation established to en- Harper and Row, under the present title, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century. The book enjoyed a modest success. A second edition, pub-lished in London in , was reprinted in and and it has. Ottoman Empire - Ottoman Empire - The decline of the Ottoman Empire, – The reign of Süleyman I the Magnificent marked the peak of Ottoman grandeur, but signs of weakness signaled the beginning of a slow but steady decline. An important factor in the decline was the increasing lack of ability and power of the sultans themselves.

      Which of the following contributed to the economic decline of Spain in the seventeenth century? I. The overexpansion of Spanish manufactures. II. The loss of a colonial empire. III. High taxes resulting from warfare. IV. The expulsion of the Moriscos. a. I and II only. . Start studying World history chapter 4 vocab and notes. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. An explorer who traveled from Venice to the Chinese court Kublai Khan in the late thirteenth century. which dominated economic thought in the seventeenth century, the ___ of a nation depends on a large.

        The variations in response to this book VENICE: PURE CITY by Peter Ackroyd are puzzling at best. Perhaps the history of the writer's output has polarized the readers. Perhaps the integration of emotional and intellectual responses in the history of the rise and present sate of Venice makes the book uncomfortable for some/5.   Inspired by Vincent Geloso, here is a list of the 25 books in economic history published since which I have found most stimulating or provocative. Not the best, nor the most ‘correct’, nor the most balanced, but those things which influenced, stimulated, or provoked my own personal thinking via books with a description from Amazon below.


Share this book
You might also like
account of the Gold Coast of Africa, with a brief history of the African company.

account of the Gold Coast of Africa, with a brief history of the African company.

Manchester fourteen miles

Manchester fourteen miles

The 1960s

The 1960s

Shakespeare for the 21st Century

Shakespeare for the 21st Century

From immigration control to induced repatriation.

From immigration control to induced repatriation.

Generalized Schur products for matrices with operator entries

Generalized Schur products for matrices with operator entries

lost keys of masonry

lost keys of masonry

British trade unions and European integration

British trade unions and European integration

Enter the dissertation.

Enter the dissertation.

Vietnam chronicles

Vietnam chronicles

Schleiermachers soliloquies

Schleiermachers soliloquies

Engineers and machinists

Engineers and machinists

Industry and economic decline in seventeenth-century Venice by Richard T. Rapp Download PDF EPUB FB2

Rapp explains the paradox of seventeenth-century Venice, a republic that experienced a relative economic decline in commerce and industry with no absolute decline in overall income. In this systematic approach to the subject of economic decline, Rapp focuses on economic factors common to all Venetian enterprise: labor supply and quality Cited by: Genre/Form: History: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Rapp, Richard T.

Industry and economic decline in seventeenth-century Venice. Cambridge, Mass. Industry and economic decline in seventeenth-century Venice Volume 69 of Harvard historical monographs Volume 69 of Historical Monographs: Author: Richard T. Rapp: Edition: illustrated: Publisher: Harvard University Press, Original from: the University of Michigan: Digitized: ISBN:Length:   This study examines the Florentine economy and women's role in it from the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries.

The changes that took place in the Florentine economy as it adapted to new economic opportunities undermine the notion of economic decline Cited by: of economic dominance from the Mediterranean to northwestern Europe.

Subsequent studies moved the decline up to the seventeenth and eigh-teenth centuries. Today even this assumption has been challenged: by Jean Georgelin for the eighteenth century (in a book long delayed in press), and by Richard Rapp for the seventeenth century. The Early Modern European Economy (New York, St.

Martin's Press, ) Pagano de Divitiis, G., English Merchants in Seventeenth-Century Italy (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, ) Poni, C. The eleven essays in this volume, edited by Paola Lanaro, Professor of History at the Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, represent an important contribution to our knowledge of the economy of the Venetian State in the early modern period and, more generally, to the debate on the Italian economic decline in the seventeenth century.

Richard Tilden Rapp is the author of Industry and Economic Decline in Seventeenth-Century Venice ( avg rating, 0 ratings, 0 reviews, published ), /5(2). INDUSTRY. INDUSTRY. The subject of industry is part of the general pattern of economic development in the early modern period.

This development had three basic phases: the first, a period of expansion running from the middle of the fifteenth century through to the very end of the sixteenth; the second, a long stagnation during the seventeenth century that lingered well into the eighteenth; the.

book. Industry and Economic Decline in Seventeenth-Century Venice (Harvard Historical Monographs) (One of the oldest, most commanding topics in early mod) European Economic History; Membership.

National advisory board Santa Fe Opera, since Member American Economics Association, Institute for Advanced Study. Connections. Rapp, Richard Industry and Economic Decline in Seventeenth Century Venice Cambridge, Mass Harvard University Press Ravid, Benjamin The Jews of Early Modern Venice Davis, Robert C.

Ravid, Benjamin Baltimore Johns Hopkins University Press Cited by: 6. economic history of early modern Italy, specializing in the study of economic decline. He has done extensive research on industrial history in the archives of Venice. His first book, Industry and Economic Decline in Seventeenth-Century Venice, will be published by the Harvard University Press in TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE Book Reviews The World Economy website helps the public learn about the world's economy.

Aimed at teachers, researchers and students of economics and economic history. Discover facts from Maddison's book via an interactive map and samples from: The World Economy: A Millennial Perspective which covers the development of the world economy over the last years.

This work examines the contrasts and shifts in fortune experienced in 17th-century Italy. The book begins with an analysis of political developments, placing the Italian states in their wider context.

The state of the economy and the far-reaching transformations it underwent are then considered. Also examined are society, religion and culture, in particular the influence of the Counter. Economic Thought and Ideology in Seventeenth-Century England [Joyce Oldham Appleby] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Economic Thought and Ideology in Seventeenth-Century EnglandCited by: [14] On the fluctuating population of Venice, see R. Rapp, Industry and Economic Decline in Seventeenth-Century Venice (Cambridge, Mass., ), [15] Such traveling opera companies, most of them from Rome or trained there, had appeared elsewhere in Italy before industry in Venice’), or its relationship to the economic decline of Venice during the seventeenth century.

2 The chapter is the result of a collaborative work, and it is part of the research. Origins. The history of the Republic of Venice traditionally begins with the foundation of the city at noon on Friday 25 March ADby authorities from Padua, to establish a trading-post in that region of northern Italy; the founding of the Venetian republic also was marked with the founding of the church of St.

James. However, the church (believed to be Saint Giacomo di Rialto) dates back. The great summit of declinism—the peak from which all subsequent declinism has declined—was established inin the book that gave decline its good name in publishing: the German historian.

The decline of woolen industry in the seventeenth century, which has often been indicated as a clear sign of Venice's economic decline, appears to be compensated by the growing importance of terraferma industries, both of woolens, and even more so of a great variety silk fabrics (the latter also in Venice itself), as demonstrated in the studies Author: Benjamin Arbel.

After the Italian turrmoil of the early 16th century, Venice entered a long and gradual period of decline. Losings its political will, Venice found the new role which it enjoyed ever since- as a.For the early period in a major governmental and economic centre, see James Lockhart, Spanish Peru, – A Colonial Society (Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, ).

It should be noted that in the heartlands of the Spanish empire in the Americas, the artisan trades brought in by the Europeans were joined to a flourishing local craft by: 2.

What initiated Venice’s decline had nothing to do with its internal political, or economic, arrangements. Rather, it was the opening of the Cape of Good Hope route to Africa ineliminating the Venetian hold over much Eastern commerce, and even more the expansion of the Ottomans afterwho ended Venetian commercial dominance.